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Facebook Reveals The 8 Ways They Are Preparing For Election Across Africa

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Social media platform Facebook has released a statement on how they are handling election across Africa.

Via a statement by Akua Gyekye, its Public Policy Manager the platform is preparing for elections across Africa.

Read the statement below;
With a number of upcoming elections across Africa, we want to share an update on our work to reduce the spread of misinformation, protect election integrity and support civic engagement across the continent. We’ve dedicated unprecedented resources to these efforts globally — and our work across Africa is focused in eight key areas.

Fighting False News

We want to stop the spread of false news on our platforms. That’s why we’ve teamed up with local third-party fact-checkers across South Africa, Nigeria, Kenya, Cameroon and Senegal — including Africa Check (Africa’s first independent fact-checking organization), AFP (Agence France-Presse – an international news agency), Pesa Check (a local Kenyan fact-checking organization) and Dubawa (a local Nigerian fact-checking organization). These independent groups help us assess the accuracy of news shared on Facebook, and when they determine content is false, we reduce its distribution in News Feed so fewer people see it. We also show related articles from fact-checkers for more context and notify users if a story they have shared is rated as false. Additionally, in Nigeria, WhatsApp has worked with Africa Check and CrossCheck Nigeria to let users send questions about potential rumors they have received through the platform. These fact-checking expansions are part of a broader strategy to fight fake news that includes extensive work to remove fake accounts; cut off incentives to the financially-motivated actors that spread misinformation; promote news literacy; and give more context so people can decide for themselves what to read, trust, and share.

Boosting Digital Literacy and Helping People Spot False News

We want to make sure people can spot false news and know how to flag it. That’s why we’ve rolled out educational tips on national and regional radio and in print media across Nigeria, South Africa, Zambia, Kenya and Zimbabwe. In Nigeria, WhatsApp has launched its “Share Facts, Not Rumours” campaign to help increase awareness about hoaxes. Additionally, at the end of last year Facebook began a new Online Safety Programme for students in Nigerian secondary schools. The 12-week workshop is designed to help teenagers understand the fundamentals of online safety and digital literacy, covering topics such as managing an online presence; social media and sharing; public Wi-Fi safety; building healthy relationships online; understanding password security and privacy settings; and identifying misinformation online.

Promoting Civic Engagement

Helping to build informed and civically engaged communities is central to our work around elections. In Nigeria, we’ve rolled out new options in English & Hausa so people can report posts that contain incorrect election information, encourage violence or otherwise violate our Community Standards. On Election Day, we’ll show a voting day reminder in English and Hausa at the top of Facebook’s News Feed.

Making Political Ads More Transparent

Earlier this month, we began temporarily expanding enforcement and not accepting foreign election ads on Facebook in Nigeria to help prevent foreign interference. Already today you can see any ad that a Page is running on Facebook, regardless if it’s shown to you.

Journalist Trainings

We continue to educate media groups and journalists across the country on best practices for sharing content on our platforms and online safety. We also provide trainings on our Community Standards, which govern what is and is not allowed on our platform.

Proactive Removal of Impersonation Accounts

We’ve always had policies against impersonation. Thanks to recent advancements in our detection technology, we’ve become much more effective at identifying these accounts.

Partnerships with NGOs and Civil Society

In order to better understand local issues and how we can tackle them more effectively, we work with a number of NGO and civil society partners across many African countries. These local partners have been instrumental in giving us feedback that we’ve incorporated into our policies and programs, including the aforementioned trainings with teens and journalists.

Connecting with Political Parties About Security

We’ve trained parties, campaigns and candidates on security best practices, including how to turn on two-factor authentication and how to avoid common threats online. For the Nigerian elections, we’ve trained vice presidential candidates, senatorial candidates and top advisors from over 35 major political parties — and the information included in these trainings is all available for anyone to access at politics.FB.com.

We want Facebook and WhatsApp to be places where people feel safe, can access accurate information and make their voices heard. We are making significant investments, both in products and in people, and continue to improve in each of these areas.

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Woman Twerks On Top Of Half-Opened Coffin As Funeral Takes Strange Turn | WATCH

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A funeral ceremony in Ecuador took a strange turn when a woman jumped on top of a half-open coffin and started twerking.

Mobile phone footage taken by a spectator shows the young woman sitting astride the coffin and dancing to the reggae music. She made a number of sexual moves and even leaned into the open part of the coffin to blow a kiss as she twerked.

Mourners watched this display in the middle of a road in the city of Manta, in the province of Manabí, Ecuador, and filmed with their phones.

A large crowd of men is seen cheering in high spirits as the music blasts from a loudspeaker.

The video was shared on Twitter along with a caption: “If yo girl doesn’t do this at yo funeral is she really yo girl.”

According to El Universo, the deceased was identified as 38-year-old Marlon Mero Quijije.

He was shot three times in different parts of his body when he was walking in the neighborhood of San Jose in Manta and was pronounced dead at the hospital.

Prosecutors believed he was a victim of an apparent robbery and was attacked when he resisted.

Diego Bolaños, Chief of Operations of the Manta District Police, explained that six bullet holes were found in the area of the attack, of which three hit Marlon.

He added that Marlon had no criminal record.

Below is the twerk video:

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A funeral ceremony in Ecuador took a strange turn when a woman jumped on top of a half-open coffin and started twerking. Mobile phone footage taken by a spectator shows the young woman sitting astride the coffin and dancing to the reggae music playing. She made a number of sexual moves and even leaned into the open part of the coffin to blow a kiss as she twerked. Mourners watched this display in the middle of a road in the city of Manta, in the province of Manabí, Ecuador, and filmed with their phones. A large crowd of men are seen cheering in high spirits as the music blasts from a loudspeaker. The video was shared on Twitter along with a caption: "If yo girl don't do this at yo funeral is she really yo girl." According to El Universo, the deceased was identified as 38-year-old Marlon Mero Quijije. He was shot three times in different parts of his body when he was walking in the neighbourhood of San Jose in Manta and was pronounced dead at the hospital. Prosecutors believed he was a victim of an apparent robbery and was attacked when he resisted. Diego Bolaños, Chief of Operations of the Manta District Police, explained that six bullet holes were found in the area of the attack, of which three hit Marlon. He added that Marlon had no criminal record. 📹 @OutSmokeChapo

A post shared by Lindaikejiblog (@lindaikejiblogofficial) on

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US 2020 Election: Trump Calls Mail-In Voting A ‘Scam’

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US President, Donald Trump, has called mail-in voting a “scam” during a press conference on Friday, September 17, blasting the voting system in which states send mail-in ballots directly to voters due to the Coronavirus pandemic.

More than half of all Americans are expected to vote through the mail this presidential election, though over 40 percent of Americans voted by mail in the 2016 and 2012 general elections, according to the Election Assistance Commission.

Several states, including Colorado, Hawaii, Oregon, Utah, and Washington, automatically send out mail-in ballots to all state residents for the general election.

But due to the Coronavirus pandemic, California, Nevada, New Jersey, Vermont, and Washington D.C. will automatically mail out ballots to all residents for the 2020 election.

“They’re sending out tens of millions of ballots to everybody, people that didn’t expect them. People are getting inundated with ballots, they’ll be showered with ballots,” Trump said Friday.

“Everybody in this room knows it’s a scam,” the president continued, gesturing to the White House press pool. “They are never going to be able to count them.”

It’s a disaster, everyone knows it,” Trump told reporters before adding that the U.S. Postal Service was not to blame for the 2020 primary election mishaps, when hundreds of thousands of ballots went uncounted .

“Where are these ballots going? Who’s sending them? Who’s signing them?” Trump asked, attempting to show why he thinks voting through the mail is insecure.

“I think it’s going to be a terrible time for this country and we are counting on federal judges to do a great constitutional job.”

Recently, Trump cynically stated that 80 million Americans would receive mail-in ballots as a result of the Coronavirus pandemic, a figure he alleges will invalidate the 2020 election results.

US 2020 Election: Trump calls mail-in voting a

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My Father Was A Freemason Grandmaster : Duncan Williams

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The leader of Action Chapel International Archbishop Nicholas Duncan Williams has opened up about his biological father indicating that he was once a freemason.

According to the man of God, his father was a grandmaster for this group which has been regarded by many as an occultic group.

He went on to state that his father was spiritually strong to the extent that he could speak and communicate with snakes.

The Archbishop in making the revelation in church explained that as a son of an occultic grandmaster, he resorted to doing so many bad things including petty theft until he was touched by God.

He went on to say that when he found God, he didn’t want his father to die in his evil and bad ways, therefore, he decided to call on his spiritual father.

He and his spiritual father decided to have a three (3) days serious fasting and prayers for his dad in other to save him from the devil.

Nicholas Duncan-Williams (born 12 May 1957) is a Ghanaian Charismatic Pioneer, the Presiding Archbishop and General Overseer of the Action Chapel International (ACI) ministry, headquartered in Accra, Ghana.

He is the founder of the Charismatic Movement which started 40 years ago in Ghana and other parts of West Africa.

CAFM, one church in many locations, has over 2000 affiliate and 250 branch churches located in North America, Europe, and Africa.

Archbishop Duncan-Williams is also the Founder and President of Prayer Summit International (PSI).

In 2017, the Archbishop was named by the New African Magazine one of “The 100 Most Influential Africans”.

The Archbishop Nicholas Duncan-Williams became the first non-American to lead the prayer for the incoming President and Vice President of the United States during the inauguration.

The Archbishop and his wife Lady Rosa Whitaker of The Whitaker Group have been named one of Africa’s power couples.

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