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Muhammad Ali has died at the age of 74, a family spokesman has said.

The former world heavyweight boxing champion, one of the world’s best-known sportsmen, died at a hospital in the US city of Phoenix, Arizona, after being admitted on Thursday.

He was suffering from a respiratory illness, a condition that was complicated by Parkinson’s disease.
The funeral will take place in Ali’s hometown of Louisville, Kentucky, his family said in a statement.

Born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Ali shot to fame by winning light-heavyweight gold at the 1960 Rome Olympics.

Nicknamed “The Greatest”, the American beat Sonny Liston in 1964 to win his first world title and became the first boxer to capture a world heavyweight title on three separate occasions.
He eventually retired in 1981, having won 56 of his 61 fights.

Crowned “Sportsman of the Century” by Sports Illustrated and “Sports Personality of the Century” by the BBC, Ali was noted for his pre- and post-fight talk and bold fight predictions just as much as his boxing skills inside the ring.

But he was also a civil rights campaigner and poet who transcended the bounds of sport, race and nationality.
Asked how he would like to be remembered, he once said: “As a man who never sold out his people. But if that’s too much, then just a good boxer. I won’t even mind if you don’t mention how pretty I was.”

Born Cassius Marcellus Clay, Ali shot to fame by winning light-heavyweight gold at the 1960 Rome Olympics.

Nicknamed “The Greatest”, the American beat Sonny Liston in 1964 to win his first world title and became the first boxer to capture a world heavyweight title on three separate occasions.
He eventually retired in 1981, having won 56 of his 61 fights.

Crowned “Sportsman of the Century” by Sports Illustrated and “Sports Personality of the Century” by the BBC, Ali was noted for his pre- and post-fight talk and bold fight predictions just as much as his boxing skills inside the ring.

But he was also a civil rights campaigner and poet who transcended the bounds of sport, race and nationality.
Asked how he would like to be remembered, he once said: “As a man who never sold out his people. But if that’s too much, then just a good boxer. I won’t even mind if you don’t mention how pretty I was.”

Won Olympic light-heavyweight gold in 1960
Turned professional that year and was world heavyweight champion from 1964 to 1967, 1974 to 1978 and 1978 to 1979
Had 61 professional bouts, winning 56 (37 knockouts, 19 decisions), and losing five (4 decisions, 1 retirement)
In February the following year, Clay stunned the boxing world by winning his first world heavyweight title at the age of 22.

He predicted he would beat Liston, who had never lost, but few believed he could do it.

Yet, after six stunning rounds, Liston quit on his stool, unable to cope with his brash, young opponent.
At the time of his first fight with Liston, Clay was already involved with the Nation of Islam, a religious movement whose stated goals were to improve the spiritual, mental, social, and economic condition of African Americans in the United States.
But in contrast to the inclusive approach favoured by civil rights leaders like Dr Martin Luther King, the Nation of Islam called for separate black development and was treated by suspicion by the American public.
Ali eventually converted to Islam, ditching what he perceived was his “slave name” and becoming Cassius X and then Muhammad Ali.

It’s a sad day for life, man. I loved Muhammad Ali, he was my friend. Ali will never die. Like Martin Luther King his spirit will live on, he stood for the world.” – Don King, who promoted many of Ali’s fights, including the Rumble in the Jungle
“Muhammad Ali was one of the greatest human beings I have ever met. No doubt he was one of the best people to have lived in this day and age.” – George Foreman, Ali’s friend and rival in the Rumble in the Jungle.

“There will never be another Muhammad Ali. The black community all around the world, black people all around the world, needed him. He was the voice for us. He’s the voice for me to be where I’m at today.” – Floyd Mayweather, world champion boxer across five divisions
How world remembers Ali
In 1967, Ali took the momentous decision of opposing the US war in Vietnam, a move that was widely criticised by his fellow Americans.

He refused to be drafted into the US military and was subsequently stripped of his world title and boxing licence. He would not fight again for nearly four years.

After his conviction for refusing the draft was overturned in 1971, Ali returned to the ring and fought in three of the most iconic contests in boxing history, helping restore his reputation with the public.

He was handed his first professional defeat by Joe Frazier in the “Fight of the Century” in New York on 8 March 1971, only to regain his title with an eighth-round knockout of George Foreman in the “Rumble in the Jungle” in Kinshasa, Zaire (now Democratic Republic of Congo) on 30 October 1974.
Ali fought Frazier for a third and final time in the Philippines on 1 October 1975, coming out on top in the “Thrilla in Manila” when Frazier failed to emerge for the 15th and final round.

Six defences of his title followed before Ali lost on points to Leon Spinks in February 1978, although he regained the world title by the end of the year, avenging his defeat at the hands of the 1976 Olympic light-heavyweight champion.
Ali’s career ended with one-sided defeats by Larry Holmes in 1980 and Trevor Berbick in 1981, many thinking he should have retired long before.

He fought a total of 61 times as a professional, losing five times and winning 37 bouts by knockout.

Soon after retiring, rumours began to circulate about the state of Ali’s health. His speech had become slurred, he shuffled and he was often drowsy.

Parkinson’s Syndrome was eventually diagnosed but Ali continued to make public appearances, receiving warm welcomes wherever he travelled.
He lit the Olympic cauldron at the 1996 Games in Atlanta and carried the Olympic flag at the opening ceremony for the 2012 Games in London.

How Ali wanted people to remember him
“I would like to be remembered as a man who won the heavyweight title three times, who was humorous and who treated everyone right. As a man who never looked down on those who looked up to him…who stood up for his beliefs…who tried to unite all humankind through faith and love.

“And if all that’s too much, then I guess I’d settle for being remembered only as a great boxer who became a leader and a champion of his people. And I wouldn’t even mind if folks forgot how pretty I was.”

Kubidyza is a Global Celebrity Blogger, Music Promoter and a Social Media Influencer | Most Influential Blogger In Ghana For Bookings: Kubinho80@gmail.com

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Monkeypox Spreads To Two More Countries After Cases Double In UK

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As the global outbreak of monkeypox continues, two more countries have confirmed cases.

Previous cases outside of Africa have been confirmed in the United Kingdom, the United States, Canada, Spain, Italy, and elsewhere in recent weeks.

While the UK Health Security Agency announced that the number of cases in the country has risen to 20, Germany and Belgium have both confirmed the presence of the smallpox-like disease.

The medical service of Germany’s armed forces confirmed finding a single case of the “virus beyond doubt for the first time in Germany on May 19 in a patient with characteristic skin lesions.”

Belgian health officials confirmed two cases of the viral disease.

According to a Flemish broadcaster, both were discovered in men who had attended the same party.

Spanish health officials confirmed 14 new cases earlier today, bringing the total to 21, mostly in and around Madrid.

Another 20 cases are suspected, 19 in Madrid’s central region and one in the Canary Islands.

Italy has also confirmed two new infections, bringing the country’s total to three.

Smallpox vaccine is being offered to UK health workers who have been exposed to the virus.

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Namibian School Warns Parents Of ‘Demonic’ Webpage Indoctrinating Children

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A Namibian school has issued a warning to parents about a “demonic” website that they claim is indoctrinating children into committing evil acts.

The state-owned Grootfontein Secondary School warned parents in a letter dated 16 May 2022 to be aware of the web pages “Chucky’s Cheese Restaurant” and “FNAF – Five Nights at Freddy” to ensure that their children are not exposed to them.

Mr Botma, the school’s principal, stated that the authorities noticed some of the students acting strangely and out of character.

Botma stated that the children in question were exposed to the Chucky’s Cheese Restaurant website.

The letter read;

16 May 2022

RE: CHUCK’S CHEESE & FNAF

It is with great concern that we bring the following to your attention. We have noticed that some of our learners are acting strangely and out of character.

We learned that some of them came into contact with a terrible webpage called: Chucky’s Cheese Restaurant.

Here children interact with a demonic doll. At first, it is very entertaining and friendly, but after a while, the doll indoctrinates them, dares them and threatens them if they do not do certain things.

Daring them includes: strangle a friend, kill a teacher, burn your house, etc.

Chucky Cheese Restaurant was recently replaced by FNAF- Five Nights at Freddy, which is even worse.

These sites are already active in Namibia.

We urge you to please control what your child is watching on your phone, their own phone, tablets, laptops, etc.

We, as parents, are thinking they are playing an innocent game, but it is NOT. They are dared to even kill.

Please also inform your friends and other family members of this. Please contact our school Counselor with any enquiries or comments. tours faithfully.

Namibian school warns Parents of

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Kwaku Bonsam ‘Curses’ President Akufo-Addo, This Is What He Said

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Nana Kwaku Bonsam, a celebrity fetish priest, has expressed Ghanaians’ collective frustration with President Nana Akufo-Addo.

According to him, President Akufo-Addo will go to hell for deceiving Ghanaians and failing the people.

Nana Kwaku Bonsam said on Angel FM, where he pronounced the curses, that Akufo-Addo has failed to deliver on his promises to Ghanaians and is thus a sure candidate for Hell.

“You mentioned that we have the money yet are hungry. But now that you’ve joined the government, we’re even more hungry. We can’t afford to live comfortably, and our girlfriends are deserting us because we can’t afford to keep up,” he explained.

“The bible talks about lies, and the President lied, thus he will go to hell,” the fetish priest believes the President’s lies will send him to hell.

Nana Kwaku Bonsam expressed concern that Ghanaians were living in abject poverty, which had been exacerbated by poor governance and economic hardship.

As a result, he has placed the blame squarely on the shoulders of President Akufo-Addo, who he claims has failed to capitalize on the country’s resources in order to push Ghana to become a prosperous nation.

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