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Samsung Galaxy X Foldable Smartphone Will Be Crushed By This Xiaomi Rival

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Samsung

It’s no secret that Samsung is hard at work on a folding flagship smartphone, dubbed Galaxy X, that sports two separate screens, including a flexible OLED panel that unfolds like the central pages of a paperback novel. After briefly revealing a heavily-disguised prototype of the new device during its annual developer conference in San Fransisco back in November 2018, Samsung has kept shtum.

But while we haven’t heard anything from the Galaxy X in a while, Samsung’s competitors certainly aren’t hanging about. With Huawei seemingly already at work on a rival foldable phone, serial leaker Evan Blass has now revealed what appears to be a competitor from Haidian District-based firm.

While there’s no shortage of companies working on folding phones, every firm has a slightly different approach to the emerging trend – while Samsung plans to use two screens on its device, Chinese company Royole has a single screen that folds once.

The advantage of these folding screens is allowing smartphone owners to increase the amount of screen real estate on a whim. While larger phablet-sized devices have become increasingly popular amongst consumers, the mammoth displays can be cumbersome to use – especially one-handed.

While there’s no shortage of companies working on folding phones, every firm has a slightly different approach to the emerging trend – while Samsung plans to use two screens on its device, Chinese company Royole has a single screen that folds once.

The advantage of these folding screens is allowing smartphone owners to increase the amount of screen real estate on a whim. While larger phablet-sized devices have become increasingly popular amongst consumers, the mammoth displays can be cumbersome to use – especially one-handed.

Being able to unfurl the full display before watching a film, but folding it away when texting on the move could e solve this problem once and for all, manufacturers hope.

Xiaomi recently announced plans to hold a press conference on January 10, 2019 where it’s expected to announce plans to spin-off its Redmi range into a separate sub-brand. Perhaps there will be time for a surprise announcement as well?

In the clip, shared on social media website Twitter, the tablet-sized device can be seen navigating around the Google Maps interface before both sides are folded backwards to create a smartphone-like form factor.

It’s unclear from the short video, but the flexible smartphone is likely to be much thicker than a standard handset, given the way the screen folds back on itself twice.

In his tweet, serial leakster Evan Blass says he can’t vouch for authenticity of the video, but given that rumours of Xiaomi building its own foldable smartphone have been circulating since 2016, we wouldn’t be surprised if this was genuine.

While there’s no shortage of companies working on folding phones, every firm has a slightly different approach to the emerging trend – while Samsung plans to use two screens on its device, Chinese company Royole has a single screen that folds once.

The advantage of these folding screens is allowing smartphone owners to increase the amount of screen real estate on a whim. While larger phablet-sized devices have become increasingly popular amongst consumers, the mammoth displays can be cumbersome to use – especially one-handed.

Being able to unfurl the full display before watching a film, but folding it away when texting on the move could solve this problem once and for all, manufacturers hope.

Xiaomi recently announced plans to hold a press conference on January 10, 2019 where it’s expected to announce plans to spin-off its Redmi range into a separate sub-brand. Perhaps there will be time for a surprise announcement as well?

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Kubidyza is a Global Celebrity Blogger, Music Promoter and a Social Media Influencer | Most Influential Blogger In Ghana For Bookings: Kubinho80@gmail.com

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Apple Music To Launch New Multi-Lingual Playlist

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Apple

Apple Music has announced its latest playlist called Suave, a multi-lingual, global R&B playlist which includes R&B songs in English, Spanish and a sprinkle of Portuguese. The new playlist will launch featuring Melii’s new song “Fresh Air.”

“We fell in love with Melii’s “Fresh Air” the moment she played it for us and we knew without a doubt that we had to launch Suave with this song,” says Marissa Gastelum, Latin Music Programmer, Apple Music. “This is the definitive home for the best of the best in R&B regardless of language.”

Suave is set to premiere on Thursday (Mar. 21) and will be updated every week with music by Paloma Mami and Rosalia, among others.

“Music itself is a universal language, but great music breaks down language barriers. When artists like Melii, Paloma Mami, Rosalía and others make great music, Suave seeks to be the intersection of culture where the music comes first,” added Alaysia Sierra, R&B and Hip Hop Programmer, Apple Music.

The playlist can be listened to here.

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Facebook Users Will Be Able To Send Messages Between Messengers, Instagram And Whatsapp : Mark Zuckerberg Announces

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Mark Zuckerberg

Facebook Messenger, WhatsApp and Instagram users will now be able to send messages to each other, Mark Zuckerberg has announced.

The Facebook boss said it will introduce the vast overhaul of the way all of its messaging apps work as part of a move towards being a “privacy-focused platform”.

That will include upgrading its encryption and refusing to store data in countries with poor human rights records, he said, as well as rewriting how the various chat apps can talk to each other.

“People want to be able to choose which service they use to communicate with people,” he wrote as part of a long explanation of his vision of the future of social networks. ”However, today if you want to message people on Facebook you have to use Messenger, on Instagram you have to use Direct, and on WhatsApp you have to use WhatsApp.

“We want to give people a choice so they can reach their friends across these networks from whichever app they prefer.”

The feature will eventually include compatibility with SMS, he said, which would for example allow someone to text someone using Facebook Messenger. People will still be able to keep all of those accounts separate if they want.

Adding that feature – which Mr Zuckerberg calls “interoperability” – will feed into the privacy focus by allowing people to avoid sending unencrypted SMS messages from Messenger and instead talking on WhatsApp, where conversations are hidden, he claimed. People would also be able to speak to someone on Facebook but do so without having to give out their phone number, he suggested.

But the possibility of combining the apps has been a long-standing source of concern for privacy advocates and using. WhatsApp and Instagram founders have left the company in recent months, reportedly after disagreements over how those various platforms should work together in future.

In the post, titled “a privacy-focused vision for social networking,” Mr Zuckerberg explained how private messaging is becoming the most common and popular method people use to interact with others on its products.

“As I think about the future of the internet, I believe a privacy-focused communications platform will become even more important than today’s open platforms,” Zuckerberg wrote. “I expect future versions of Messenger and WhatsApp to become the main ways people communicate on the Facebook network.”

In his letter, Mr Zuckerberg detailed why people prefer private networks and the intimacy it offers them.

“People are more cautious of having a permanent record of what they’ve shared,” Mr Zuckerberg added. “I believe the future of communication will increasingly shift to private, encrypted services where people can be confident what they say to each other stays secure and their messages and content won’t stick around forever. This is the future I hope we will help bring about.”

In addition to interoptability, he said Facebook would focus on several principles as it tried to create the future of social networking:

Private interactions. People should have simple, intimate places where they have clear control over who can communicate with them and confidence that no one else can access what they share.Encryption. People’s private communications should be secure. End-to-end encryption prevents anyone — including us — from seeing what people share on our services.Permanence. People should be comfortable being themselves, and should not have to worry about what they share coming back to hurt them later. So we won’t keep messages or stories around for longer than necessary to deliver the service or longer than people want it.Safety. People should expect that we will do everything we can to keep them safe on our services within the limits of what’s possible in an encrypted service.Interoperability. People should be able to use any of our apps to reach their friends, and they should be able to communicate across networks easily and securely.Secure data storage. People should expect that we won’t store sensitive data in countries with weak records on human rights like privacy and freedom of expression in order to protect data from being improperly accessed.
Mark Zuckerberg
The changes will be taking place “over the next year and beyond”, said Mr Zuckerberg, noting there will be “more details and tradeoffs to work through related to each of these principles”.

“Doing this means taking positions on some of the most important issues facing the future of the internet. As a society, we have an opportunity to set out where we stand, to decide how we value private communications, and who gets to decide how long and where data should be stored,” he concluded.

“I believe we should be working towards a world where people can speak privately and live freely knowing that their information will only be seen by who they want to see it and won’t all stick around forever. If we can help move the world in this direction, I will be proud of the difference we’ve made.”

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Ghana Ranked 25th Country With Least Mobile Data Charges Worldwide

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Ghana has been ranked 25th among the list of countries in the world with low mobile data charges.

This follows a recent statistic which showed that the price of an average 1GB of data is being sold in the country at $1.56.

Comparing the cost of the data to other countries, Ghana emerged the 25th country.

Zimbabwe emerged the country with the most expensive data charges, selling same data package at $75.20.

The research was from data gathered from 6,313 mobile data plans in 230 countries between 23 October and 28 November 2018.

The country with the cheapest data packages worldwide according to the research was India which charges $0.26.

In Ghana, the research said data packages could go down as low as $0.34 and as high as $4.75, equivalent of ¢25.96.

Mobile data is very cheap in some countries because of an impressive and efficient mobile and fixed broadband infrastructure.

Countries with less advanced broadband networks are heavily reliant on mobile data as well as the dictates of their economies.

“Many of the cheapest countries in which to buy mobile data fall roughly into one of two categories. Some have excellent mobile and fixed broadband infrastructure and so providers are able to offer large amounts of data, which brings down the price per gigabyte. Others with less advanced broadband networks are heavily reliant on mobile data and the economy dictates that prices must be low, as that’s what people can afford,” the research stated.

Contrary to what one might expect, ten out of the top 50 cheapest countries in the world for mobile data are in Sub-Saharan Africa.

This is in stark contrast to the cost of broadband on the continent, which is almost universally very high or non-existent.

Rwanda and Sudan featured in the top ten, with 1GB of data being sold for just $0.56 and $0.68 respectively.

However, Zimbabwe is seen as the country with the most expensive data charges, selling same data package at $75.20.

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